Monthly Archives: April 2012

Komisi I Dukung Rencana TNI AD Beli Tank Leopard

28 April 2012

Tank Leopard 2A6 (image : Militaryphotos)

Senayan – Komisi I DPR RI sepakat untuk mendukung rencana TNI AD membeli tank Leopard produksi Jerman. Sebelumnya banyak anggota Komisi Pertahanan yang menolak rencana pembelian tank bekas pakai Belanda ini. Mereka menolak karena perangkat perang ini tak sesuai dengan kondisi geografi Indonesia dan alih teknologinya sulit direalisasikan oleh produsen.

Komisi I akan mengiyakan secara resmi rencana TNI AD ini dengan catatan, sepanjang tidak ada upaya politisasi dari pihak mana pun. Selain itu, pembelian tank tersebut harus dilakukan langsung ke produsen di Jerman.

“Dengan demikian, memungkinkan adanya alih teknologi dan kerja sama pemeliharaan antara produsen dan PT Pindad,” ujar Ketua Komisi I DPR RI Mahfudz Siddiq kepada Jurnalparlemen.com, Jumat (27/4).

Menurut Mahfudz, pembelian langsung ke produsen tank Leopard di Jerman akan memungkinkan modifikasi sesuai kebutuhan Indonesia dan lebih efisien harganya.

Meskipun hampir semua anggotanya menyatakan dukungan, hingga kini Komisi DPR belum mengeluarkan keputusan resmi guna menyetujui rencana ini. Keputusan resmi akan dikeluarkan setelah anggaran untuk meng-goal-kan rencana ini dianggap sesuai. “Ya, Komisi I memang belum memutuskan persetujuan anggaran untuk pengadaan tank tersebut,” ujar Wasekjen DPP PKS ini


(Jurnal Parlemen)

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Argentina Defence and Security Report 2012

By on Friday, April 20th, 2012

The Argentine defence sector did not see any major shocks over 2011. Tensions continue to grow between the UK and Argentina concerning Las Malvinas/The Falkland Islands, but it is highly unlikely that a military conflict will erupt again between the two states. The Argentine government has continued with its policy of improving domestic production capabilities and BMI believes that recent technological and development cooperation agreements between Argentina and Brazil are best viewed as moves to strengthen this capability. BMI forecasts military spending to increase over 2011 and through to 2015, but not at rates significant enough to transform the procurement environment of to provide major opportunities for companies being squeezed by defence cuts around the rest of the world.

In an important development, Argentine defence minister Arturo Puricelli met his Brazilian counterpart Celso Amorim in a September meeting in Buenos Aires. The two countries hold regular defence talks as part of what they termed their ‘strategic alliance’. In order to facilitate even closer relations between the neighbouring countries, a permanent dialogue is being created to allow constant contact on a wide range of issues, including defence. One particularly significant development to emerge from the meeting was the agreement to explore avenues for joint weapons production, research and even procurement.

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Tensions have been rising in the Argentine-British dispute over the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands/Las Malvinas. The Argentine government recently described the 2,000 British inhabitants of the island as ‘hostages’ and has been stepping up efforts to force the British government into negotiations.

Puricelli has said that the British government is incapable of thinking about the issue as anything other than ‘a fortress supported with strong budgets’. The comments were prompted by a UK think-tank report urging higher defence spending in order to fend off a potential Argentine attack. Argentina has recently threatened to cut off air links to the islands. President Kirchner threatened to withdraw from a 1999 agreement which allows flights from the islands to fly over Argentine territory and to make stops at Rio Gallegos.

In procurement news, 40 more ‘Pampas’ are to be bought by the Argentine Air Force. Puricelli signed off on the move in September 2011, ordering 40 models of the FadeA IA-63 ‘Pampas’. The planes are advanced trainers developed domestically. There are plans, however, to develop a new ‘Pampa NG’ light strike fighter off of the current Pampas model. The 40 planes will be delivered over a four-year period beginning late 2012.

Meanwhile, Argentina is now able to maintain its submarine fleet, after the completion of work on a shipyard in the country. CINAR, the Naval Industrial Complex of the country’s Navy, has recently been refurbished. The ‘San Juan’ submarine, which was launched in 1985, has been the first to benefit from the new domestic capabilities. Prior to this development, the submarines had to be sent to Brazil to be maintained and upgraded. The submarine, along with the ‘Santa Fe’, was originally built in Germany. Four more models were to be constructed in Argentina but these plans were dropped due to budget problems.

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Following the Trophy Success, RAFAEL Develops Hard Kill Countermeasures for Helicopters

RAFAEL has demonstrated key elements for an active defense system for helicopters, designed to protect from unguided weapons such as Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPG). These threats that are typically fired from very short range, proved lethal against helicopters in recent conflicts, particularly in Iraq, Afghanistan and Somalia. In a recent terror attack on the Southern border near Eilat, terrorists fired RPGs against Israeli attack helicopters, but luckily did not hit them.

Shoulder-Launched, Man Portable guided Missiles (MANPADS) are considered the common threat to helicopters and aircraft they are typically engaged by countermeasures (also known as ‘soft kill’ defenses). Such countermeasures include flares, infrared jammers and electronic countermeasures, aiming to distract, confuse or incapacitate the ‘soft elements’ of the threat, like the guidance systems of incoming missiles missiles, or their command links. In contrast, the RPG does not have a ‘soft side’, it is unguided, fired at a straight line from very short range, and when the warhead is activated, on impact with the target or other objects, its relatively large warhead causes an explosion that would destroy a soft target like a helicopter.

Widely used with insurgents and terrorist groups worldwide, RPGs and MANPADS  are posing a significant threat to helicopters, particularly in the take-off, landing and low hovering phase, as they make a large, slow and vulnerable target. MANPADS such as the Stinger, SA-7, 14, 18 and latest generation SA-24 are widely available, putting at risk aircraft and helicopters at low and medium altitudes. A number of new countermeasures are designed to address the advanced MANPADS threats, including new laser-based directional infrared countermeasures (DIRCM) and multi-spectral flares, but the RPG threat has sofar remained unchallenged.

RAFAEL’s new ‘Hard Kill’ technology marked an important milestone in September 2011, demonstrating the kill of an incoming RPG at a safe distance from the protected platform. The new system dubbed ‘Fliker’ is developed by the company’s MANOR Technologies Division with support by the Israeli MOD Defense Research & Development Directorate (DRDD).

Fliker is designed as an add-on defensive layer, augmenting existing warning systems and countermeasures used on combat helicopters. As such, it will be activated after all other measures have failed to defeat the threat, meaning the time remaining for engagement and the distance to the target are shortest. To minimize response time Manor designers developed a new launcher for this application, combining pyrotechnic charges and high speed electrical motors to achieve very high traverse rate, while aiming at the target with high accuracy to achive effective kill without initiating the RPG’s explosive charge. (the same counter-RPG concept is used in hard kill systems on tanks).

Specialized in the development of warheads, MANOR defined a unique kill mechanism for the Fliker, taking the impact point as far as possible from the protected platform and reducing collateral damage effect to minimize the risk of debris hitting the helicopter. The warhead is activated by an advanced optical proximity sensor also developed by RAFAEL. Fliker is designed as an add-on kit augmenting existing self protection systems operating on helicopters. The kit will include the specialized turret, interceptors and software enhancements to the self protection system, that will identify a threat ‘not responding’ to soft kill countermeasures, thus activating Fliker for the hard-kill.

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US to move 9,000 Marines from southern Japan

By on Friday, April 27th, 2012

The United States is to shift 9,000 Marines out of Japan in a move Washington hopes will ease sometimes fractious relations with its ally over the huge American military presence.

The redeployment, which will see troops moved to Guam, Hawaii and Australia, will go ahead regardless of any progress on the moving of a busy airbase on Okinawa that had originally been a key plank of a deal with the US.

In a joint statement issued in Washington and Tokyo, the two sides said they remained committed to the relocation of the Futenma base from its present urban location to a coastal spot — a move that is heavily resisted in Okinawa.

The two governments “reconfirmed their view that (this) remains the only viable solution that has been identified to date,” the statement said.

The deal comes just ahead of a visit to Washington by Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, who will meet with President Barack Obama on Monday for what both sides hope will be a demonstration that the alliance is back on track.

Japan and the United States have long clashed over Okinawa, the site of sporadic tensions with US troops. Around half of the 47,000 US service personnel in Japan are based on the strategically located island, which is nearer to Taiwan than it is to Tokyo.

In 2006, the United States agreed to shift the Futenma air base — a longtime source of grievance as it lies in a crowded urban area — to a quiet stretch of seashore, with 8,000 Marines leaving Okinawa for Guam.

But some activists in Okinawa pressed for the base to be removed completely. The controversy felled one Japanese prime minister, Yukio Hatoyama, who failed to fulfil campaign pledges in 2009 to renegotiate the deal.

Speaking ahead of the official announcement, Kurt Campbell, the Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, said the deal would move relations forward.

“We think it breaks a very long stalemate that has plagued our politics, that has clogged both of our systems, that has made it difficult to deal with the critical and crucial issues that confront the United States and Japan,” Campbell said.

The statement said the total cost of the relocation to Guam was expected to be $8.6 billion, with a US official saying more than a third would be paid by Tokyo.

“The $3.1 billion dollar Japanese cash commitment… is significant and we particularly appreciate this commitment in the context of Japan’s fiscal challenges, which we fully recognise,” a senior official at the US defence department said.

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Iran ‘mobilizing’ for cyberwar with West: experts

By on Friday, April 27th, 2012

Iran is busy acquiring the technical know-how to launch a potentially crippling cyber-attack on the United States and its allies, experts told a congressional hearing on Thursday, urging the US to step up its defensive measures.

“Over the past three years, the Iranian regime has invested heavily in both defensive and offensive capabilities in cyberspace,” said Ilan Berman, vice president of the American Foreign Policy Council.

“Equally significant, its leaders now increasingly appear to view cyber-warfare as a potential avenue of action against the United States,” he told a House Homeland Security subcommittee.

Patrick Meehan, Republican chairman of the committee, also sounded an alarm over the cyber-security threat posed by Iran to western nations.

“As Iran’s illicit nuclear program continues to inflame tensions between Tehran and the West, I am struck by the emergence of another possible avenue of attack emanating from Iran — the possibility that Iran could conduct a cyber attack against the US homeland,” he said.

The Republican lawmaker said Tehran has reportedly invested over $1 billion in bolstering cyber capabilities, and is believed by some analysts to be the perpetrator of recent attacks on news organizations.

“Iran is very publicly testing its cyber capabilities in the region and, in time, will expand its reach,” Meehan warned.

He added that he has concluded after consultations with US partners in the Middle East that “Iran is the most destructive and malicious actor in the region and will persist in antagonizing the United States and our allies — especially the state of Israel.”

Meehan recalled Senate testimony earlier this year from Director of National Intelligence James Clapper who testified that Iran’s intelligence operations against the United States, including cyber capabilities, “have dramatically increased in recent years in depth and complexity.”

Experts on the panel said Iran’s desire to target the United States could be fueled by a desire for payback after the 2010 Stuxnet worm attack which disabled the Iranian centrifuges used to enrich uranium, dealing a major setback to Iran’s nuclear program.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack although speculation has centered on Israel and the United States.

Stuxnet and similar cyber-attacks allegedly launched against Iran by the West are likely to have steeled its resolve to launch a cyber-assault of its own, experts said.

“For the Iranian regime the conclusion is clear. War with the West, at least on the cyber front, has been joined, and the Iranian regime is mobilizing in response,” Berman said.

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Northrop Grumman to Collaborate with PT INTI to Produce Ground-Based Radar Systems

24 April 2012

Northrop Grumman AN/TPS-78 Ground Based Air Defence Radar System (photo : diariolibre)

BALTIMORE, Md. — Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) executed a Memorandum of Understanding at the Sixth National Radar Seminar in Bali, Indonesia with PT Industri Telekomunikasi Indonesia and the Research Centre For Electronics And Telecommunications of The Indonesian Institute Of Sciences to facilitate collaboration on pending ground-based radar opportunities in Indonesia.

The Northrop Grumman AN/TPS-78 is the latest generation of state-of-the-art radars made possible by advances in high power transistor technology and designed to operate in some of the harshest, most unforgiving environments. Proven in the field, the S-Band long-range AN/TPS-78 is the choice of the U.S. Air Force and customers worldwide.

“With this agreement, Northrop Grumman will bring its recognized leadership in ground radars together with our Indonesian business partners’ combined expertise in electronics research and manufacturing and knowledge of the unique needs of the Indonesian government,” said Robert Royer, vice president of international systems at Northrop Grumman’s Land and Self Protection Systems Division. “Our team looks forward to participating in the upcoming Indonesian ground-based radar competition designed to help Indonesia increase air surveillance control and secure its border.”

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US Wants a Stake in Israel’s Iron Dome Technology

Defense lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives are demanding ‘rights to Israel’s Iron Dome Technology’ before releasing the requested $680 million to follow-on production of the Iron Dome anti-rocket weapon systems for Israel, Washington news blog The Hill reports. “The United States has invested nearly $900 million into Iron Dome work, yet it has no rights to the technology involved,” according to the subcommittee’s legislation. The House proposal should share some rights to the weapon’s proprietary technology “as is consistent with prior U.S.-Israeli missile defense cooperation,” according to the subcommittee. If the new funding is granted, the US investment in the production phase of the Iron Dome would more than triple Israel’s own investment in the development of the system.

While Israel often relies on US funding for full-scale development of its defense systems (such as the Merkava, Arrow or David’s Sling), the Israeli MOD has reserved proprietary rights to some highly sensitive technologies, including missiles, satellites, unmanned systems. As such proprietary technology, the Iron Dome anti-rocket weapon was developed exclusively, in record time, by Israel’s RAFAEL Advanced defense Systems, with an Israeli investment of nearly one billion Israeli Shekels (US$260 million.) Al the system’s elements, including the radar, battle management system, communications and the unique effector (including the missile interceptor, guidance and warhead), are products of Israeli inventions. This investment enabled the Israelis to accelerate the development, fielding the system within less than three years from the unofficial program launch.

Beside the rapid availability of such an asset, which already proved critical for the country’s defense in the past year, by owning this Intellectual Property could enable Israel to export the system to its allies abroad without any foreign restrictions. Several customers have already lined up for the system and, executives at RAFAEL’s partner Raytheon Company believe the U.S. itself could be interested in its capability.

“Iron Dome is a game changer. The threats Israel faces from incoming, indiscriminate terrorist rocket attacks are countered by this cutting edge anti-missile system. Iron Dome is fundamentally shifting political, diplomatic and military realities on the ground” said U.S. Rep. Howard L. Berman, the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee and author of the “Iron Dome Support Act” (IDSA).

Original co-sponsors of the legislation include Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), U.S. Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-NY), Ranking Member of the Middle East and South Asia Subcommittee, U.S. Rep Steve Chabot (R-OH), the Chairman of the Middle East and South Asia Subcommittee, U.S. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI), and U.S. Rep. Ann Marie Buerkle (R-NY). Now House members are introducing a new claim, as they want Missile Defense Agency chief Lt. Gen. Patrick O’Reilly to “ensure the United States has appropriate rights to this technology” before further money is moved.

House members suggest DOD and O’Reilly “should explore any opportunity to enter into co-production of the Iron Dome system with Israel, in light of the significant U.S. investment in this system,” according to the panel’s draft bill. Iron Dome developer RAFAEL and the US Raytheon Company have formed an ongoing cooperation for the development and future production of the David’s Sling medium-range air and missile defense system. Agreements about possible cooperation on the future production of Iron Dome have also been discussed, and Raytheon has informally briefed US military about the system its possible uses to defend US forces deployed abroad.

Support for the Iron Dome is mounting on the Hill, since President Obama introduced his version of the FY2013 budget proposal, which didn’t include funding for the Israeli anti-rocket weapon program. In March, the Pentagon said it intended to seek funds to help Israel buy more Iron Dome equipment. At the same time  a bipartisan group introduced the Iron Dome Support Act in Congress, authorizing the administration to provide more funds for Israel to extend the air-defense system (UPI). A month later, a bill earmarking up to $680 million for Iron Dome procurement over three years from 2012 to 2015, was put together by members of the House of Representatives Republicans led by House Foreign Affairs Committee. Israeli officials said in early April that the ministry is seeking $700 million from the United States to pay for at least four additional Iron Dome batteries to reinforce the three already deployed.

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