Tag Archives: Russian

Russian Engine to Power Chinese J-31 5th Generation Fighter

A Russian-made RD-93 engine will power the Chinese J-31 fifth generation fighter, Rosoboronexport official told RIA Novosti Monday.

“J-31 with the Russian engine RD-93 is considered to be an export program, able to compete with the American F-35 fifth generation aircraft on the regional markets,” Rosoboronexport’s Air Force Equipment Export Department Head Sergey Kornev told RIA Novosti in an interview.

“The program is ambitious, but very real, especially considering the high cost of F-35 and some problems with its development,” Kornev added.

Sergey Kornev, who is heading the Russian delegation at China International Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition in Zhuhai, told RIA Novosti that two fifth generation fighters are being developed in China, the J-20 and J-31, which demonstrates the high potential of Chinese science and aviation industry.

The J-31 fifth generation fighter flew a maiden flight in October 2012 and there is currently only one prototype available. The twin-engine jet bears some resemblance with the Russian T-50 or PAK FA fifth-generation fighter.

China has also been developing its stealth J-20 fighter, which first took off in 2011, and is expected to be operational by 2017 or later.

Russian RD-93 engines are a variant of the RD-33 engines, initially developed to power MiG-29 fighters. The RD-93 was developed by Russia’s Klimov design bureau specifically for the FC-1 fighter, known in Pakistan as the JF-17 Thunder.

The world’s only fifth generation fighter in service is the US F-22 Raptor, while F-35, Russian T-50 and Chinese J-20 and J-31 are at various stages of development.

Kornev also mentioned about the problem of China’s making copycat copies of Russian weapons, but pointed out that there is a resolution to that.

“The problem [of China violating copyright of Russian weapons] exists, but it is solvable, and both sides are seeking the settlement of controversial situations,” Rosoboronexport’s Air Force Equipment Export Department Head Sergei Kornev said prior to the Airshow China 2014 exhibition, which will be held in southern China’s city of Zhuhai on November 11-16.

He cited a 2008 deal on intellectual property protection in military-technical cooperation between the two nations as a good example of Russia-China cooperation on the issue.

“We continue joint activities on elaboration of working mechanisms of exposing violations. The problem is concealed in the inconsistence of local legislations as well as international acts,” Kornev added.

The defense official, however, underscored that military-technical cooperation between Russia and China has no hurdles which could not be cleared.

In 1992, China bought Russia’s Su-27 fighter jets. Fifteen years later, Beijing unveiled J-11B aircraft which Moscow labeled as a copycat version of Su-27.

Russia has also accused China of producing cloned versions of Su-33 fighter jet, S-300 air defense system, the Smerch multiple rocket launcher and the Msta self-propelled howitzer in violation of intellectual property agreements.

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NATO Tracks Large-Scale Russian Air Activity In Europe

By on Friday, October 31st, 2014

NATO detected and monitored four groups of Russian military aircraft conducting significant military manoeuvers in European airspace over the Baltic Sea, North Sea/Atlantic Ocean, and Black Sea on 28 and 29 October 2014. These sizable Russian flights represent an unusual level of air activity over European airspace.

Eight Russian Aircraft Intercepted over North Sea / Atlantic Ocean on 29 October 2014
At approximately 3:00 a.m. CET on 29 October, NATO radars detected and tracked eight Russian aircraft flying in formation over the North Sea. F-16 aircraft from the Royal Norwegian Air Force were scrambled, intercepted and identified the Russian aircraft, which included four Tu-95 Bear H strategic bombers and four Il-78 tanker aircraft.

The formation flew from mainland Russia over the Norwegian Sea in international airspace. Six of the Russian aircraft then turned back to the north-east towards Russia, while two Tu-95 Bear H bombers continued south-west, parallel to the Norwegian coast, heading to the south-west.

The Russian aircraft continued over the North Sea, and Typhoon fighters from the United Kingdom were scrambled in response. While over the Atlantic Ocean west of Portugal, the two Russian aircraft were intercepted and identified by F-16s from the Portuguese Air Force. The Russian aircraft turned back heading north-east, flying to the west of the United Kingdom.

NATO aircraft from the United Kingdom and Norway were standing by and NATO assets on the ground and in the air tracked the Russian aircraft throughout. At present, the two Tu-95 bombers appear headed back to Russia, but as of 4 p.m. CET the aircraft were still airborne.

The bomber and tanker aircraft from Russia did not file flight plans or maintain radio contact with civilian air traffic control authorities and they were not using on-board transponders. This poses a potential risk to civil aviation as civilian air traffic control cannot detect these aircraft or ensure there is no interference with civilian air traffic.

Four Russian Aircraft Intercepted over Black Sea on 29 October 2014
During the afternoon of 29 October, NATO radars detected and tracked four Russian aircraft flying over the Black Sea in international air space, including 2 Tu-95 Bear-H bombers and 2 Su-27 Flanker fighter jets. Fighters from the Turkish Air Force have intercepted the Russian aircraft and NATO is continuing to track them in international airspace. As of 4 p.m. CET the aircraft were still airborne.

Multiple Russian Aircraft Intercepted over Baltic Sea on 29 October 2014
During the afternoon of 29 October, NATO radars detected and tracked a number Russian aircraft flying over the Baltic Sea in international airspace, including 2x MiG-31 Foxhound, 2x Su-34 Fullback, 1x Su-27 Flanker and 2x Su-24 Fencer jets.

Portuguese F-16 Fighters assigned to the Baltic Air Policing Mission were scrambled in response and the Russian aircraft returned to Russian airspace.

Seven Russian Fighter Jets also Intercepted on 28 October 2014
During the afternoon of 28 October, NATO radars detected and tracked seven Russian combat aircraft flying in international airspace over the Baltic Sea. The aircraft were detected at approximately 2:30 p.m. CET on 28 October and included 2x MiG-31 Foxhound, 2x Su-34 Fullback, 1x Su-27 Flanker and 2x Su-24 Fencer jets.

The Russian aircraft were flying in the Gulf of Finland and were intercepted by German Typhoon fighter jets from NATO’s Baltic Air Policing Mission in order to identify the aircraft and protect Allied air space. The Russian aircraft continued into the Baltic Sea and were subsequently intercepted by Allied fighters from Denmark as well as fighters from Finland and Sweden, which are not members of NATO. The Russian fighters continued to the Kaliningrad Oblast. The Russian aircraft had filed a flight plan with air traffic control authorities, were using transponders, but did not maintain radio contact with civilian air traffic control.

NATO jets were on standby throughout the duration of both Russian flights and Russian aircraft were continually tracked using Allied assets on the ground and in the air. NATO has conducted over 100 intercepts of Russian aircraft in 2014 to date, which is about three times more than were conducted in 2013.

Scrambles and intercepts are standard procedure when an unknown aircraft approaches NATO airspace. However, such flights pose a potential risk to civil aviation given that the Russian military often do not file flight plans, or use their on-board transponders. This means civilian air traffic control cannot detect these aircraft nor ensure there is no interference with civilian air traffic.

NATO Allies protect their airspace on a 24/7 basis. Allied air defence efforts are focused on stopping unauthorised incursions into NATO airspace and on preventing acts of airborne terrorism.

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Russian flights over Europe raise tension: US military

By on Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Russian military flights over European airspace are raising tensions and pose a potential danger to security and to civilian aircraft, a US military spokesman said Friday.

The United States was concerned about the flights of Russian warplanes and was tracking the activity “very closely,” Rear Admiral John Kirby told reporters.

“We certainly don’t see these increased flights and activity as helpful to the security situation in Europe. Clearly, they pose the potential risk of escalation,” he said.

The flights also represented “a potential risk to civil aviation just in the sheer number of and size of and scope of these flights,” Kirby said.

There was another round of flights on Friday, with NATO monitoring Russian planes over the Baltics, the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean.

“The aircraft involved fighter jets, long-range bombers and tanker aircraft,” Kirby said.

He added that the United States wants Russia “to take steps, concrete tangible steps to reduce tension, not increase it.”

NATO this week said Russian military aircraft engaged in large-scale flight operations in European airspace and alliance planes were sent up to intercept and identify them.

NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg said Thursday that the transatlantic alliance remained vigilant in the face of the Russian flights.

The air activity follows Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine, which NATO has condemned, calling it the most serious threat to transatlantic security since the Cold War.

NATO says there have been more than 100 intercepts of Russian aircraft in 2014 to date, about three times the number in 2013.

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NATO Air Policing Fighters Intercept Russian Aircraft over the Baltic Sea

By on Monday, October 27th, 2014

NATO radars detected and tracked one unidentified aircraft flying in the vicinity of Allied airspace in the Baltic Sea on Tuesday, 21 October at approximately 9 a.m. CET. Fighter jets from NATO Ally Denmark (F-16) were scrambled, as were Portuguese F-16 aircraft from NATO’s Baltic Air Policing Mission in order to identify the aircraft and maintain the security of Allied air space. Non-NATO fighters from Sweden were also involved in the intercept.

The aircraft was identified as a Russian IL-20 (intelligence collection aircraft). The Russian IL-20 took off from Kaliningrad and commenced flying over the Baltic Sea towards Denmark. The Russian aircraft was first intercepted by Danish F-16’s and as the IL-20 headed further north it was intercepted by fighters from Sweden. The Russian aircraft headed south again and Portuguese F-16’s were scrambled. At 12:53 p.m. CET the IL-20 approached Estonian airspace from the northeast. The Russian aircraft entered Estonian airspace near the island of Saaremaa for a period of less than one minute, which represented an incursion of about 600 meters into NATO airspace.

Portuguese F-16s made visual contact with the IL-20 and escorted it until it was further away from NATO airspace. NATO jets assigned to the Baltic Air Policing Mission were available throughout the duration of the Russian flight and the IL-20 was continually tracked using Allied assets on the ground and in the air.

Scrambles and intercepts are standard procedure when an unknown aircraft approaches NATO airspace. However, such flights pose a potential risk to civil aviation given that the Russian military often do not file flight plans, or use their on-board transponders. This means civilian air traffic control cannot detect these aircraft nor ensure there is no interference with civilian air traffic. NATO Allies protect their airspace on a 24/7 basis and NATO tracks all flight activities over Europe.

NATO air defence efforts are focused on stopping unauthorized incursions into NATO airspace and on preventing acts of airborne terrorism.

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Russian Fighter Jet 10m from Swedish Plane

By on Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

Russian fighter jets have been acting more aggressively around Swedish reconnaissance aircrafts lately, according to Anders Grenstad, deputy director of operations in the Swedish Armed Forces.

On Friday a photo was released by the authority for signals intelligence, FRA, of a Russian Su-27 flying only a few meters away from a Swedish surveillance aircraft. According to Grenstad this more aggressive behavior is a new development.

“You ought to keep a distance of between fifty and one hundred and fifty metres if you want to show that you are there and assert your country’s interests. But this is much more intrusive and, of course, it could go wrong if the pilot is not sufficiently skilled in the maneuvering that he is forced to do here,” Grenstad told Swedish Radio News.

It is in particular in the international air space that the Russian planes have become more aggressive, Swedish Radio reports. The photo released by FRA show a plane only ten metres away from the Swedish aircraft, and the pilot makes sure he turns the plane in a way that the six air-to-air missiles under the plane can be seen.

But there are also examples of when Russian planes have flown into Swedish air space. In September two Russian planes flew over the island of Öland off the Swedish east coast. The then Foreign minister Carl Bildt said that was the most serious violation of Swedish air space that he had experience as a foreign minister.

In the interview with Swedish Radio News, deputy director Anders Grenstad does not want to answer directly the question if the Swedish security alert has been raised because of this, but he says the military preparedness is constantly adjusted to the existing situation.

“Things are looking different out there. So the people who work in that environment are mentally prepared for a situation where there is a more intrusive courting or something,” he said.

But shall we be concerned that Russia would suddenly attack Sweden? asks Swedish Radio News.

“No, absolutely not,” replied Grenstad.

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Peru to Receive 8 Russian Military Helicopters in December

By on Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Russia will deliver 8 Mi-171Sh multi-purpose helicopters to Peru’s air force in December, the deputy director of Russia’s arms export agency was quoted as saying Friday.

Peru, a major buyer of Russian military hardware, bought 24 helicopters from Russia for $406 million in December last year for use in combating drug trafficking and to replace eight Mi-17 military transport helicopters purchased from the Soviet Union in 1984.

“Two or three weeks ago, the Russian Defense Minister visited Peru and we [Russia and Peru] discussed the project’s progress,” RIA Novosti quoted Sergey Goreslavsky, the deputy director of Rosoboronexport, as saying. “The first eight helicopters … will be delivered in the first half of December.”

Goreslavsky said Russia would deliver the new helicopters by December 9, in time for military celebrations in Peru that month. The Peruvian Defense Ministry said in May the helicopters would be delivered in November.

Russian and Soviet aircraft form a large part of Peru’s air force — about half of Peru’s warplanes are Russian-made, and most of its helicopters. In recent years, Moscow has been trying to reenergize its economic and political ties to South America.

As part of a separate deal, Peru is also spending $11 million to repair and refit three Mi-171 helicopters bought from Russia in 2010, and $2.8 million to overhaul an Mi-17-1B helicopter used to transport the Peruvian president.

Goreslavsky also reaffirmed Rosoboronexport’s participation in the creation of a maintenance and repair center in Peru for Russian helicopters and Su-25 fighter jets used by South American countries.

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Russian Navy Launches First Submarine for Black Sea Fleet

The first in the series of six Varshavyanka-class diesel-electric submarines, built for Crimea-based Black Sea Fleet, will be put in service with the Russian Navy on August 22, a Navy spokesman said on Tuesday.

“On August 22, St. Andrew’s flag of the Russian Navy will be raised on diesel-electric submarine Novorossiisk at the Admiralty Shipyards in St. Petersburg,” Capt. 1st Rank Igor Dygalo said.

According to the spokesman, the submarine is currently undergoing the second testing phase in the Baltic Sea and will soon arrive at the Admiralty Shipyards.

Construction of the Novorossiisk submarine started in August 2010, followed by the Rostov-on-Don sub in November 2011, the Stary Oskol in August 2012, and the Krasnodar in February 2014.

The much-anticipated delivery of these submarines, dubbed by the US Navy as “black holes in the ocean” because they are nearly undetectable when submerged, is a key part of Russia’s naval strategy in the Mediterranean, where Moscow has recently deployed a permanent task force consisting of some 10 surface ships.

The Varshavyanka-class (Project 636.3) is an improved version of the Kilo-class submarines and features advanced stealth technology, extended combat range and the ability to strike land, surface and underwater targets.

These submarines are mainly intended for anti-shipping and anti-submarine missions in relatively shallow waters.

The vessels, crewed by 52 submariners, have an underwater speed of 20 knots, a cruising range of 400 miles (electric propulsion) with the ability to patrol for 45 days. They are armed with 18 torpedoes and eight surface-to-air missiles.

The Russian Black Sea Fleet has not received new submarines for decades and currently operates only one boat – the Kilo-class Alrosa, which joined the Navy in 1990.

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