Tag Archives: Vehicles

US to Sell Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicles to Pakistan

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Pakistan for 160 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles, spair and repair parts, and training, etc., for an estimated cost of $198 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

The Government of Pakistan has requested a possible sale of 160 Navistar Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles to include (110 MaxxPro Dash DXM, 30 MaxxPro Base DXM, 10 MaxxPro Dash DXM Ambulances, and 10 MaxxPro Recovery Vehicles with protection kits), spare and repair parts, support and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and equipment training, U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistical and program support. The estimated cost is $198 million.

The proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a country vital to U.S. foreign policy and national security goals in South Asia.

The proposed sale of MRAPs will ensure that Pakistan can effectively operate in hazardous areas in a safe, enhanced survivability vehicle, and improves Pakistan’s interoperability with U.S. forces. By acquiring this capability, Pakistan will be able to provide the same level of protection for its own forces as the United States provides for its forces. Pakistan, which currently possesses MRAPS, has successfully demonstrated the ability to operate and maintain the vehicles in counterinsurgency and counterterrorism operations, and will have no difficulty absorbing these additional vehicles into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not affect the basic military balance in the region.

The principal contractor will be Navistar Defense Corporation in Madison Heights, Michigan. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of the proposed sale will require approximately two (2) U.S. Government and twenty-four (24) contractor representatives in Pakistan for a period of approximately 18 months to perform inspections and deprocessing of vehicles upon delivery; provide assistance in installation of vehicle accessory kits; provide fault diagnosis and repairs; perform corrective maintenance, to include accident and battle damage assessment and repairs; conduct operator and maintainer training; and conduct inventories and maintain accountability of USG provided material.

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

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Joint Effort Validates Ability to Move Stryker Vehicles Via Air

Four Stryker combat vehicles were successfully loaded onto a C-17 Globemaster III Aug. 13,2014, on the flightline here, marking the Army’s first use of the Stryker Marshalling Pad and Hot Cargo Pad since their construction.

According to Glen Bailey, the 15th Wing Plans and Programs chief of support agreements, the SMP and HCP were built specifically to support the 25th Infantry Division combat vehicles.

The Stryker, the Army’s interim armored vehicle, is used to provide quick response maneuvering capability, enhanced survivability and lethality, and expand fight versatility.

“The beddown of the C-17s and the 25th ID Strykers were linked from the beginning,” he said. “Early discussions by senior leadership identified the need for the joint training of Stryker movements through Hickam Field utilizing C-17 aircraft.”

Army Lt. Col. Jeff Howell, the 25th ID future operations director, said it took a lot of coordinating to get the scheduling of the training timed just right due to the Army’s high deployment tempo.

However, Howell said, the training exercise was necessary, because it is an important part of validating the unit’s readiness.

“Having this capability means our unit is more prepared to respond to any contingency in the Pacific, and that (Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam) is prepared to help push us out on those contingencies,” he said.

A large piece of that capability, Howell said, is having a place to conduct preflight inspections and load the aircraft, and that’s where the SMP and HCP come into play.

Howell said the first training exercise was an overwhelming success, due in large part to the working relationships between the services.

“This has been in the works for two months, and the biggest takeaway from today is the coordination between all of the organizations that made it happen,” he said. “We worked with (Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam), 15th Wing and the 735th Air Mobility Squadron, so it was truly a joint effort.”

Until recently, the Army relied on moving their Hawaii-based Stryker vehicles via ships.

Acknowledging the C-17s critical support role, Howell said it was great having the Air Force integrate into their training exercise.

“The 15th WG completely embraced their role as intra-theater airlift,” he said. “It’s great training with those guys because they are really professional.”

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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Electric UAVs 2014-2024

By on Monday, August 25th, 2014

Thousands of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) will be deployed in the next few years for both civil and military missions. Early adoption of new technologies will be employed: from smart skin to structural components and intelligent motors with integral gearing.

Electric power makes the use of wheel power for take-off possible because electric motors can give maximum torque from stationary. It gives us near silent operation, in the air and on the ground, with virtually no noise or gaseous emissions, something valued in both military and civil applications. For long range UAVs where batteries are inadequate and hybrid powertrains are necessary, there can still be silent take-off and landing.

Only electrics can give us new forms of UAV; intelligently swarming robot flies being just one example of new missions made possible by electric power in UAVs.

There is work on unmanned aircraft harvesting power from winds at altitude using kites and beaming it to earth. No, this does not break the laws of physics. Other UAVs are held aloft by lasers and one other project will result in upper atmosphere UAVs that stay aloft for five years just on sunshine.

There is a concept of a military UAV, maybe hybrid electric, which performs its mission then dives like a gannet and hides underwater. Vertical take-off and landing UAVs are now commonplace, the best known being toys that can be programmed in a desired pattern of flight but there are also military and professional civil versions being deployed.

This unique report examines what will be achieved and the enabling technologies that will make it possible. The PhD level analysts at IDTechEx have been studying the subject for many years and initially they encompassed much of this analysis in a popular report on electric aircraft of all sorts. However, there is now so much happening in UAVs alone that this report has been prepared to focus on UAVs alone. No other report is as up-to-date and insightful about this subject.

BUY THIS REPORT

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Corps Advancing Amphibious Vehicles, Landing Craft for 21st Century Warfare

Combat-development and integration officials and technological experts are looking to ever-evolving advancements in technology to enhance the Corps’ ability to conduct amphibious operations in the 21st century.

These plans include procuring the right ship-to-shore connectors for amphibious operations and improving armored ground mobility so infantry units can close on an objective from the sea with greater protection and lethality.

The air cushioned landing craft, the LCAC, will be eventually be replaced with the Ship to Shore Connector (SSC), a more capable air cushioned craft. A potential vehicle being explored is the Ultra-Heavy Amphibious Connector (UHAC), which operates on water and land with captive air cell treads. A half-scale model is undergoing testing and a full sized version has the potential to lift three times as much as the SSC with a range of over 200 nautical miles.

The Corps is also seeking ideas from industry to develop a family of systems capable of delivering heavy loads, such as several main battle tanks, as well as smaller loads such as an armored combat vehicle, from amphibious ships to shore at distances of over 100 nautical miles and at speeds of up to 25 knots.

To tackle the problem of mobility once close to shore and inland, the Corps is also developing a wheeled amphibious combat vehicle that, once ashore, can move Marines to their objectives with greater speed, lethality and protection than the Corps’ current tracked Amphibious Assault Vehicle.

“The ACV’s ability to operate in loose sand, snow, mud, and (its) ability to climb grades will be superior to the current AAV,” said Col. Christopher Woodbridge, the Corps’ lead for the Ground Combat /Tactical Vehicle Strategy planning team.

Along with better mobility and vehicle suspension than the tracked vehicle, the wheeled ACV has the ability to move out of a kill zone even after losing a wheel to a blast.

“One of the things we found in Iraq and Afghanistan was that our (seven-ton tactical trucks), which weren’t specifically built for IEDs, did much better than our other vehicles because it had such higher ground clearance,” said Brig. Gen. William Mullen, director, Capabilities Development Directorate, in a video interview published in April 2014.

“It’s going to be lethal, more lethal. It’s going to be faster; the troops inside are going to be better protected. That’s why we are going after the ACV.”

According to Woodbridge, the Corps can expect to see fielded ACVs in 2017, with an initial operating capability in 2020. Until the ACVs are fielded, the Corps plans to sustain and upgrade a number of its tracked AAVs. This upgrade program will extend the AAV’s service life through 2035.

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Oshkosh Defense Showcases New Variants of MRAP All-Terrain Vehicles at Eurosatory 2014

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, will unveil its new MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) variants to military leaders and dignitaries from around the world at Eurosatory 2014 in Paris, starting today through June 20. Oshkosh has expanded its combat-proven M-ATV Family of Vehicles to serve a spectrum of mission requirements and needs for armed forces around the world.

“Our M-ATVs provide extreme off-road mobility and are consistently selected as the MRAP of choice by leading militaries for a full range of missions,” said U.S. Army Major General (retired), John Urias, Oshkosh Corporation executive vice president and president of Oshkosh Defense. “We’ve worked closely with our customers to develop, test and produce our new M-ATV variants – each one equipped for a specific mission profile with specialized functionality to support the most challenging operations you can imagine.”

Expanded M-ATV Family of Vehicles
The global M-ATV Family of Vehicles includes two multi-mission models – the M-ATV Standard and M-ATV Extended – with many variants. The M-ATV Standard model provides response and support capabilities for a range of offensive and defensive missions in off-road environments. The M-ATV Extended model delivers increased capacity for additional troops and equipment to support a wider assortment of mission profiles, such as mounted infantry support, explosive ordnance support and command-and-control.

The M-ATV Family of Vehicles includes:

  • M-ATV Standard Base (SXB)
  • M-ATV Standard Upgrade (SXU)
  • M-ATV Standard Special Forces (SXF)
  • M-ATV Extended Intervention (EXI)
  • M-ATV Extended Engineer (EXE)
  • M-ATV Extended Command (EXC)

All Oshkosh M-ATVs deliver the industry’s highest level of off-road performance and feature common components, such as the Oshkosh TAK-4 independent suspension and integrated crew protection systems. The M-ATV platform meets a wide range of protection, performance, payload and transportability requirements for peacekeeping, internal security, border security, special operations, counterinsurgency and conventional military operations.

Oshkosh L-ATV on Display
Oshkosh Defense also will have its Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV) on display at Eurosatory 2014. The L-ATV meets a global need for a new level of protected mobility for a light vehicle and replaces decades-old vehicle fleets that lack protection capabilities against today’s most significant threats, including improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and rocket-propelled grenades.

The Oshkosh L-ATV platform was selected for the U.S. Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program’s current Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMD) phase and is undergoing rigorous U.S. Government testing. The JLTV program will fill the current tactical wheeled-vehicle capability gap between larger MRAP vehicles and the aging High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV) fleet.

The Oshkosh L-ATV uses the company’s proprietary TAK-4i intelligent independent suspension system to deliver 25 percent improved wheel travel. Based on extensive testing that represents 85 percent of the Earth’s terrain, the L-ATV is proven to perform at speeds 70 percent faster than traditional MRAP vehicles in off-road environments.

Exhibit Information
The Oshkosh M-ATV SXF variant and L-ATV Base variant, in addition to an integrated product support (IPS) kiosk showcasing Oshkosh’s vast support services will be showcased on-site at Eurosatory in Hall 5 at Booth D657. Leaders will be available to discuss the vehicles and the company’s broader portfolio of technologies and services.

There will also be live demonstrations of Oshkosh TerraMax UGV technology on an M-ATV SXB variant equipped with a mine roller at 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday during the show outside of the Paris Nord Villepinte Exhibition Centre.

Oshkosh Defense is a leading provider of tactical wheeled vehicles and life cycle sustainment services. For more than 90 years, Oshkosh has been mobilizing military and security forces around the globe by offering a full portfolio of heavy, medium, light and highly protected military vehicles to support our customers’ missions.

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Laser Weapon Being Readied for Marine Vehicles

By on Friday, June 13th, 2014

As the Navy prepares to deploy its first laser weapon on a ship later this summer, Office of Naval Research (ONR) officials announced June 11 that they have finished awarding contracts to develop a similar weapon to be used on ground vehicles.

The Ground-Based Air Defense Directed Energy On-the-Move program, commonly referred to as GBAD, aims to provide an affordable alternative to traditional firepower to keep enemy unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from tracking and targeting Marines on the ground.

ONR is working with Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division and industry partners on the development of GBAD’s components and subsystems, including the laser itself, beam director, batteries, radar, advanced cooling, and communications and command and control.

“We’re confident we can bring together all of these pieces in a package that’s small enough to be carried on light tactical vehicles and powerful enough to counter these threats,” said Brig. Gen. Kevin Killea, vice chief of naval research and commanding general, the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory.

The GBAD system is being designed for use on light tactical vehicles such as the Humvee and Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. With the proliferation of UAV technology, Marine Corps leaders expect that units increasingly will have to defend themselves against adversaries trying to perform reconnaissance and surveillance on them from the air.

“We can expect that our adversaries will increasingly use UAVs and our expeditionary forces must deal with that rising threat,” said Col. William Zamagni, acting head of ONR’s Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department. “GBAD gives the Marine Corps a capability to counter the UAV threat efficiently, sustainably and organically with austere expeditionary forces. GBAD employed in a counter UAV role is just the beginning of its use and opens myriad other possibilities for future expeditionary forces.”

The technologies being developed under the GBAD program are a direct response to the Marine Corps Science and Technology Strategic Plan, which calls for a mobile directed-energy weapon capable of destroying threats such as UAVs.

“Aggressive action against air threats is needed for the Marine Air-Ground Task Force to conduct expeditionary maneuver. Everything about this program is geared toward realizing a viable directed-energy capability in support of that objective to allow our Marines to be fast and lethal,” said Lee Mastroianni, program manager for Force Protection in ONR’s Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department.

Some of the system’s components already have been used in tests to detect and track UAVs of all sizes. Later in the year, researchers will test the entire system against targets using a 10kW laser as a stepping stone to a 30kW laser.

The 30kW system is expected to be ready for field testing in 2016, when the program will begin more complex trials to ensure a seamless process from detection and tracking to firing, all from mobile tactical vehicles.

The program has benefitted from previous investments, studies and technology development by the Department of Defense High Energy Laser Joint Technology Office, MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, the Penn State Electro-Optics Center and the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command.

“These partnerships, along with strong support from Marine Corps leadership, are vital as we move forward to see how this capability opens up new frontiers on the battlefield,” Mastroianni said.

All the pieces for the system are being developed under ONR’s Future Naval Capabilities program, which brings proven technology to military acquisition programs in rapid fashion, going from research-and-development to delivery in five years.

ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps’ technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs more than 1,000 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.

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Mexico to Buy M1152 High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Mexico for M1152 High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs) and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $556 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on May 16, 2014.

The Government of Mexico has requested a possible sale of 3,335 M1152 High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs), spare and repair parts, support and test equipment, communication equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistical and program support. The estimated cost is $556 million.

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a strategic partner. Mexico has been a strong partner in combating organized crime and drug trafficking organizations. The sale of these HMMWVs to Mexico will significantly increase and strengthen its capability to provide in-country troop mobility to provide security.

Mexico intends to use these defense articles and services to modernize its armed forces and expand its existing army architecture to combat drug trafficking organizations. This will contribute to the Mexican military’s goal of updating its capabilities, while further enhancing interoperability between Mexico and the U.S. and among other allies. Mexico will have no difficulty absorbing these vehicles into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The principal contractor will be AM General in South Bend, Indiana. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of this proposed sale will require at least four U.S. Government or contractor representatives to travel to Mexico for a period of three years to provide operational and maintenance training.

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

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